Tips

Hard of hearing Autism Language impairment Deaf
Hard of hearing

To make it easy to lipread, don’t cover your mouth with your hands or clothing

Hard of hearing

Find a suitable place to talk, with good lighting to aid lipreading, and away from noise and distractions

Hard of hearing

If someone doesn't understand what you've said, don't keep repeating it. Try saying it in a different way instead

Hard of hearing

Don't shout. It can be uncomfortable for hearing aid users, and it looks aggressive

Hard of hearing

If you're using communication support, always remember to talk directly to the person you are communicating with, not the interpreter

Hard of hearing

Use natural facial expressions and gestures

Hard of hearing

Speak clearly but not too slowly, and don't exaggerate your lip movements as this can make it harder to lipread

Hard of hearing

Get the listener's attention before you start speaking, for example by waving, tapping on the table

Hard of hearing

Make sure you have face-to-face contact

Hard of hearing

Even if someone is wearing hearing aids it doesn't mean they can hear you perfectly. Ask what helps him to communicate together

Autism

Communication difficulties are common with Autism, in specific in reading social cues and body language. Be patient and understanding

Autism

Avoid using irony, sarcasm, figurative language, rhetorical questions, idioms or exaggeration. If you do use these, explain what you have said and be clear about what you really mean to say
 

Autism

Structure your questions, eg you could offer options or choices

Autism

Don’t use too many questions and keep them short

Autism

Use their special interest, or the activity they are currently doing, to engage them, when you are contacting children

Autism

Visualise where you can. For example written language, picto’s and photos

Autism

Do not touch your communication partner without warning

Autism

Do not always expect eye contact. That can be uncomfortable for your communication partner

Autism

People with autism tend to take things literally. Try not to communicate between the lines

Language impairment

Concentrate on the message the learner is trying to communicate rather than the grammar

Language impairment

If you say someone's name before asking them a question they will know you want their attention

Language impairment

Give time to think and respond to question

Language impairment

When possible create time, peace and space for every conversation

Language impairment

Do not let students listen and at the same time take notes

Language impairment

Use objects, pictures and photos when possible

Language impairment

Read aloud a lot with mimicry and natural gestures

Language impairment

Be clear in your body language

Language impairment

Give one message at a time

Language impairment

Repeat what you have understood and ask further

Language impairment

Respond to all communicative intentions of a person with a language impairment

Deaf

Write it down. Don’t be afraid to write or draw to help understanding.

Deaf

Repeat and re-phrase if necessary. Trying to say the same thing in a different way might help.

Deaf

Take turns. If there is more than one person in a conversation take turns to talk.

Deaf

Speak clearly, slowly and steadily. Don’t mumble, shout or exaggerate – it distorts your lip patterns.

Deaf

Keep some distance from a deaf person during a conversation, for hearing-aid users, lip-readers and signers.

Deaf

Make sure your face is not in shadow and there are no strong lights or sunshine in their eyes.

Hard of hearing

Make sure your face is not in shadow and there are no strong lights or sunshine in their eyes.

Deaf

Check noise and lighting.  Turn off or move away from background noise.

Deaf

Try not to look away or cover your mouth as many deaf people rely on lip reading to help them understand you.

Deaf

Make eye contact and keep it while you are talking

Deaf

Always face a deaf person